Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement

On August 27, 2018, the United States and Mexico reached an interim agreement in principle, subject to completion and implementation. On September 30, 2018, Canada and the United States agreed with Mexico on a new, modernized agreement. On May 30, U.S. Trade Representative Robert E. Lighthizer presented Congress with a draft declaration on the administrative steps needed to implement the U.S.-Mexico Agreement (USMCA and the new NAFTA), in accordance with the 2015 Presidential Trade Promotion (TPA) Administrative Action Statement. The project will allow congress to be presented to Congress, after 30 days, on June 29, a law to implement the USMCA. In a letter [73] to Nancy Pelosi, House of Representatives spokeswoman Kevin McCarthy, the minority leader of the House of Representatives, the Republican, told Lighthizer that the USMCA was the gold standard in U.S. trade policy, modernizing the competitive trade in digital, intellectual property and services in the United States and creating a level playing field for U.S. businesses. , workers and farmers, an agreement that represents a fundamental shift in trade relations between Mexico and Mexico. The parties agreed to establish important procedural safeguards for the recognition of new geographic indications (G.A.), including strong protection standards against the issuance of geographical indications that would prevent the use of common names by the United States, as well as the establishment of a mechanism for consultation between the parties on future geographical indications, in accordance with international agreements. On December 9, 2019, Fox News reported that negotiators from the three countries reached an agreement on implementation, paving the way for a final agreement within 24 hours and ratification by all three parties before the end of the year.

Mexico has agreed to impose a minimum wage of $16 per hour for Mexican auto workers by a “neutral” third party. Mexico, which imports all of its aluminum, also objected to the provisions relating to the U.S. steel and aluminum content of automotive components. [37] (a) in a country or territory other than Canada, which applies a trade agreement under Schedule IV of the Banking Act, and the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) is a trade agreement between these parties. The USMCA replaced the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). For the first time, the agreement is specifically aimed at agricultural biotechnology to support 21st century innovations in agriculture. The text covers all biotechnology, including new technologies such as gene processing, while the trans-Pacific Partnership text covered only traditional rDNA technology. In particular, the United States, Mexico and Canada have agreed on provisions to improve information exchange and cooperation on trade-related issues in agricultural biotechnology. On April 3, 2020, Canada informed the United States and Mexico that it had completed its national process of ratifying the agreement.

[104] U.S. dairy farmers will have new export opportunities to sell dairy products in Canada. Canada will provide new access to U.S. products, including liquid milk, cream, butter, skimmed milk powder, cheese and other dairy products. It will also eliminate its tariffs on whey and margarine. For poultry, Canada will provide new access to chickens and eggs in the United States and increase access for turkeys. Under a modernized agreement, all other tariffs on agricultural products traded between the United States and Mexico remain zero. The full text of the agreement between the United States, Mexico and Canada is available here. The U.S.-Mexico agreement is based on the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which originally came into force on January 1, 1994.

No Comments

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.